Adapting and Advancing: How This Tech Professional Landed a Job With a Big Four Accounting Firm

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In the world of coding, adaptability is key. Processes change, technologies evolve, and new challenges can arise at any time. As someone who attended UofT SCS Coding Boot Camp between January and July of 2020, Daniel Slobodscoy knows this firsthand. 

When COVID-19 struck, Daniel had to adjust to remote learning while also navigating the immigration process to move back to Israel with his wife and newborn baby. 

He had a well-established career in Toronto as a partner for companies such as Aroma Espresso Bar and Metropolitan Movers, but wanted a job that would allow him to work from anywhere in the world. His lifelong interest in technology and the flexibility provided by tech jobs inspired him to enroll in the boot camp. 

Making adjustments in order to advance 

Coming from a customer service background in an industry not related to technology, Daniel found it somewhat challenging to adjust to remote learning during the pandemic.

“I really liked in-person learning, but the boot camp instructor would always tell us that we need to learn how to adapt to new systems,” he said. “It was a challenge, but we had to overcome it and continue pushing.” 

From day one of the boot camp, Daniel focused on taking comprehensive notes — something he found much easier to do in-person than online. When the program went virtual, he had to figure out the best way to continue learning from home — but once he got the hang of it, he was back to taking exceptional notes. 

“You need to invest many hours into the boot camp, which is challenging — especially if you’re working full-time,” he said. “But if you’ve decided to change your career, this is what it takes.” 

Daniel’s transition was made easier by supportive instructors and assistant instructors who were always willing to help. They were available to assist learners whenever needed — and if they couldn’t answer a question right away, they always followed up later.

“Their actions reflected on the [learners], too,” said Daniel. “If you see the instructor or assistant instructors going the extra mile, you want to go the extra mile as well.” 

Networking, networking, and more networking 

A major difference between the boot camp and Daniel’s past educational experiences was the program’s overarching focus on becoming employer ready.

“They prepared us for the day-to-day of a job in the field,” he said. “That’s a really great aspect of the boot camp experience that going to university doesn’t give you.”

Shortly after finishing the boot camp, Daniel moved with his family to Israel, where his wife is attending medical school. The boot camp’s career services team reached out to successful learners once a month with a list of available jobs or internships at various companies. Daniel always submitted his resume.

Three months after completing the program, Daniel got an internship with a startup called MyShoperon, which he was introduced to by a friend he met at the boot camp. Daniel ended up connecting another boot camp learner to this company, and that friend was also offered an internship. Since then, two other learners from the boot camp have joined. “Understanding how important networking is, I took advantage of the opportunity the boot camp provided me with,” said Daniel. “I would tell anyone in this industry to continue networking and to make connections at any opportunity.” 

After completing the internship, Daniel received a job offer from Capgemini, a large consulting and technology service provider. The boot camp’s career services team played a huge role in him landing the offer.

“I continued talking to my career advisor after finishing the boot camp and she was a great resource,” Daniel said. “She was guiding me to find a job, but she was also just helping me mentally, almost like a psychologist — asking questions and supporting  me.” 

He also received an offer from the Big Four accounting firm KPMG, which he ultimately decided to accept. 

Looking ahead, Daniel is eager to continue building upon the skills he gained in the boot camp to eventually do something big within the tech industry.

“I would love to invent something in the future,” he said. “But for now, I just want to make sure I learn how to do everything from the inside out.” 

Interested in seeing where the boot camp could take you? Explore UofT SCS Boot Camps today.

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